Ivanka Trump Said That She Will Be The First Female President, NOT Hillary Clinton

A new book about Donald Trump is about to hit the shelves, and two of the biggest revelations are that Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka thinks she will be the first female president, and Steve Bannon thinks that Donald Trump, Jr. June 2016 with a Russian attorney was “treasonous”.

According to a new book seen by the Guardian, Ivanka Trump thinks she will be the first female president:
Jared [Kushner] and Ivanka had made an earnest deal between themselves: If sometime in the future the time came, she’d be the one to run for president (or the first one of them to take the shot). The first woman president, Ivanka entertained, would not be Hillary Clinton, it would be Ivanka Trump.

Former Trump campaign manager Bannon also called the 2016 meeting between Donald Trump Jr. and a group of Russians “treasonous.” Bannon said the meeting that occurred during the 2016 presidential race was “treasonous” and “unpatriotic.”

“They’re going to crack Don Junior like an egg on national TV,” Bannon reportedly told author Michael Wolff, referring to the investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election.

After news of the meeting surfaced last year, Bannon reportedly said: “The three senior guys in the campaign thought it was a good idea to meet with a foreign government inside Trump Tower in the conference room on the 25th floor — with no lawyers. They didn’t have any lawyers.”

“Even if you thought that this was not treasonous, or unpatriotic, or bad shit, and I happen to think it’s all of that, you should have called the FBI immediately,” Bannon said, according to the book.

The quotes were chronicled in the book “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” which is scheduled to be released next week.

Trump Tower meeting with Russians ‘treasonous’, Bannon says in explosive book

Donald Trump’s former chief strategist Steve Bannon has described the Trump Tower meeting between the president’s son and a group of Russians during the 2016 election campaign as “treasonous” and “unpatriotic”, according to an explosive new book seen by the Guardian.

Bannon, speaking to author Michael Wolff, warned that the investigation into alleged collusion with the Kremlin will focus on money laundering and predicted: “They’re going to crack Don Junior like an egg on national TV.”

Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, reportedly based on more than 200 interviews with the president, his inner circle and players in and around the administration, is one of the most eagerly awaited political books of the year. In it, Wolff lifts the lid on a White House lurching from crisis to crisis amid internecine warfare, with even some of Trump’s closest allies expressing contempt for him.

Bannon, who was chief executive of the Trump campaign in its final three months, then White House chief strategist for seven months before returning to the rightwing Breitbart News, is a central figure in the nasty, cutthroat drama, quoted extensively, often in salty language.

He is particularly scathing about a June 2016 meeting involving Trump’s son Donald Jr, son-in-law Jared Kushner, then campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya at Trump Tower in New York. A trusted intermediary had promised documents that would “incriminate” rival Hillary Clinton but instead of alerting the FBI to a potential assault on American democracy by a foreign power, Trump Jr replied in an email: “I love it.”

The meeting was revealed by the New York Times in July last year, prompting Trump Jr to say no consequential material was produced. Soon after, Wolff writes, Bannon remarked mockingly: “The three senior guys in the campaign thought it was a good idea to meet with a foreign government inside Trump Tower in the conference room on the 25th floor – with no lawyers. They didn’t have any lawyers.

“Even if you thought that this was not treasonous, or unpatriotic, or bad shit, and I happen to think it’s all of that, you should have called the FBI immediately.”

Bannon went on, Wolff writes, to say that if any such meeting had to take place, it should have been set up “in a Holiday Inn in Manchester, New Hampshire, with your lawyers who meet with these people”. Any information, he said, could then be “dump[ed] … down to Breitbart or something like that, or maybe some other more legitimate publication”.

Bannon added: “You never see it, you never know it, because you don’t need to … But that’s the brain trust that they had.”

Special counsel Robert Mueller was appointed last May, following Trump’s dismissal of FBI director James Comey, to investigate Russian meddling in the 2016 election. This has led to the indictments of four members of Trump’s inner circle, including Manafort and former national security adviser Michael Flynn. Manafort has pleaded not guilty to money laundering charges; Flynn has pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. In recent weeks Bannon’s Breitbart News and other conservative outlets have accused Mueller’s team of bias against the president.

Trump predicted in an interview with the New York Times last week that the special counsel was “going to be fair”, though he also said the investigation “makes the country look very bad”. The president and his allies deny any collusion with Russia and the Kremlin has denied interfering.

Bannon has criticised Trump’s decision to fire Comey. In Wolff’s book, obtained by the Guardian ahead of publication from a bookseller in New England, he suggests White House hopes for a quick end to the Mueller investigation are gravely misplaced.

“You realise where this is going,” he is quoted as saying. “This is all about money laundering. Mueller chose [senior prosecutor Andrew] Weissmann first and he is a money-laundering guy. Their path to fucking Trump goes right through Paul Manafort, Don Jr and Jared Kushner … It’s as plain as a hair on your face.”

Last month it was reported that federal prosecutors had subpoenaed records from Deutsche Bank, the German financial institution that has lent hundreds of millions of dollars to the Kushner property empire. Bannon continues: “It goes through Deutsche Bank and all the Kushner shit. The Kushner shit is greasy. They’re going to go right through that. They’re going to roll those two guys up and say play me or trade me.”

Scorning apparent White House insouciance, Bannon reaches for a hurricane metaphor: “They’re sitting on a beach trying to stop a Category Five.”

He insists that he knows no Russians, will not be a witness, will not hire a lawyer and will not appear on national television answering questions.

Fire and Fury will be published next week. Wolff is a prominent media critic and columnist who has written for the Guardian and is a biographer of Rupert Murdoch. He previously conducted interviews for the Hollywood Reporter with Trump in June 2016 and Bannon a few months later.

He told the Guardian in November that to research the book, he showed up at the White House with no agenda but wanting to “find out what the insiders were really thinking and feeling”. He enjoyed extraordinary access to Trump and senior officials and advisers, he said, sometimes at critical moments of the fledgling presidency.

The rancour between Bannon and “Javanka” – Kushner and his wife Ivanka Trump – is a recurring theme of the book. Kushner and Ivanka are Jewish. Henry Kissinger, the former secretary of state, is quoted as saying: “It is a war between the Jews and the non-Jews.”

Trump is not spared. Wolff writes that Thomas Barrack Jr, a billionaire who is one of the president’s oldest associates, allegedly told a friend: “He’s not only crazy, he’s stupid.”

Trump took credit for planes not crashing. An astronaut’s response has Trump seeing stars

While many people have lampooned President Trump’s hilarious attempt to claim personal responsibility for 2017’s lack of deaths by commercial airliner, few have the aviation credibility of former astronaut Captain Mark Kelly.

Kelly knew exactly how to respond when he saw this tweet that the President sent this morning:

Trump’s strictness on “Commercial Aviation,” as he unexpectedly capitalizes it, has no more to do with airline safety than his tweeting has to do with internet security. Does he mean that aviation safety is the only area where he won’t be trying to repeal all of the existing regulations in order to make the business owners more profitable at the expense of the general public’s benefit?

Kelly decided to give the credit to those who really deserve it and to let Trump know what he should actually be taking credit for.

Touché, Captain Kelly. Even if you weren’t the husband of former Congresswoman and shooting survivor Gabrielle Giffords and a noted gun-control advocate in your own right, your logic on presidential responsibility is so strong that your tweet would have gone viral anyway.

If only the President himself wasn’t so congenitally immune to logical thought and reason, your impeccable analogy might prove effective at teaching him to properly assign accountability.

The Republicans’ Fake Investigations

A generation ago, Republicans sought to protect President Richard Nixon by urging the Senate Watergate committee to look at supposed wrongdoing by Democrats in previous elections. The committee chairman, Sam Ervin, a Democrat, said that would be “as foolish as the man who went bear hunting and stopped to chase rabbits.”

Today, amid a growing criminal inquiry into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, congressional Republicans are again chasing rabbits. We know because we’re their favorite quarry.

In the year since the publication of the so-called Steele dossier — the collection of intelligence reports we commissioned about Donald Trump’s ties to Russia — the president has repeatedly attacked us on Twitter. His allies in Congress have dug through our bank records and sought to tarnish our firm to punish us for highlighting his links to Russia. Conservative news outlets and even our former employer, The Wall Street Journal, have spun a succession of mendacious conspiracy theories about our motives and backers.

We are happy to correct the record. In fact, we already have.

Three congressional committees have heard over 21 hours of testimony from our firm, Fusion GPS. In those sessions, we toppled the far right’s conspiracy theories and explained how The Washington Free Beacon and the Clinton campaign — the Republican and Democratic funders of our Trump research — separately came to hire us in the first place.

We walked investigators through our yearlong effort to decipher Mr. Trump’s complex business past, of which the Steele dossier is but one chapter. And we handed over our relevant bank records — while drawing the line at a fishing expedition for the records of companies we work for that have nothing to do with the Trump case.

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Republicans have refused to release full transcripts of our firm’s testimony, even as they selectively leak details to media outlets on the far right. It’s time to share what our company told investigators.

We don’t believe the Steele dossier was the trigger for the F.B.I.’s investigation into Russian meddling. As we told the Senate Judiciary Committee in August, our sources said the dossier was taken so seriously because it corroborated reports the bureau had received from other sources, including one inside the Trump camp.

The intelligence committees have known for months that credible allegations of collusion between the Trump camp and Russia were pouring in from independent sources during the campaign. Yet lawmakers in the thrall of the president continue to wage a cynical campaign to portray us as the unwitting victims of Kremlin disinformation.
We suggested investigators look into the bank records of Deutsche Bank and others that were funding Mr. Trump’s businesses. Congress appears uninterested in that tip: Reportedly, ours are the only bank records the House Intelligence Committee has subpoenaed.

We told Congress that from Manhattan to Sunny Isles Beach, Fla., and from Toronto to Panama, we found widespread evidence that Mr. Trump and his organization had worked with a wide array of dubious Russians in arrangements that often raised questions about money laundering. Likewise, those deals don’t seem to interest Congress.

We explained how, from our past journalistic work in Europe, we were deeply familiar with the political operative Paul Manafort’s coziness with Moscow and his financial ties to Russian oligarchs close to Vladimir Putin.

Finally, we debunked the biggest canard being pushed by the president’s men — the notion that we somehow knew of the June 9, 2016, meeting in Trump Tower between some Russians and the Trump brain trust. We first learned of that meeting from news reports last year — and the committees know it. They also know that these Russians were unaware of the former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele’s work for us and were not sources for his reports.

Yes, we hired Mr. Steele, a highly respected Russia expert. But we did so without informing him whom we were working for and gave him no specific marching orders beyond this basic question: Why did Mr. Trump repeatedly seek to do deals in a notoriously corrupt police state that most serious investors shun?

What came back shocked us. Mr. Steele’s sources in Russia (who were not paid) reported on an extensive — and now confirmed — effort by the Kremlin to help elect Mr. Trump president. Mr. Steele saw this as a crime in progress and decided he needed to report it to the F.B.I.

We did not discuss that decision with our clients, or anyone else. Instead, we deferred to Mr. Steele, a trusted friend and intelligence professional with a long history of working with law enforcement. We did not speak to the F.B.I. and haven’t since.

After the election, Mr. Steele decided to share his intelligence with Senator John McCain via an emissary. We helped him do that. The goal was to alert the United States national security community to an attack on our country by a hostile foreign power. We did not, however, share the dossier with BuzzFeed, which to our dismay published it last January.

We’re extremely proud of our work to highlight Mr. Trump’s Russia ties. To have done so is our right under the First Amendment.

It is time to stop chasing rabbits. The public still has much to learn about a man with the most troubling business past of any United States president. Congress should release transcripts of our firm’s testimony, so that the American people can learn the truth about our work and most important, what happened to our democracy.

Trump to announce ‘most dishonest’ and ‘corrupt media awards’ next week

President Trump took his hostility to the media to a new level on Tuesday by announcing he would give “awards” next week to what he deems the “most dishonest” reporting of last year.

“I will be announcing THE MOST DISHONEST & CORRUPT MEDIA AWARDS OF THE YEAR on Monday at 5:00 o’clock.” Trump tweeted on Tuesday, adding: “Subjects will cover Dishonesty & Bad Reporting in various categories from the Fake News Media. Stay tuned!”

Yet Trump’s definition of “fake news” is subjective. He often attacks well-sourced stories containing potentially embarrassing details about his administration, particularly with regard to the Russia investigations. Critics say Trump’s attacks amount to an attack on the First Amendment itself.

Trump, who has made a regular habit slamming the media since even before he took office, originally floated the idea of opening a “fake news trophy” contest in November.

“We should have a contest as to which of the Networks, plus CNN and not including Fox, is the most dishonest, corrupt and/or distorted in its political coverage of your favorite President (me),” Trump said then. “They are all bad. Winner to receive the FAKE NEWS TROPHY!”

In an email solicitation last month, the Trump-Pence Make America Great Again Committee asked donors to take a poll to name the worst “fake news story” of 2017.

Trump’s tweet Tuesday comes after he threatened North Korea’s Kim Jong Un of having a “bigger & more powerful” nuclear button in the latest ongoing war of words between the two leaders.

In November, a new poll from conservative-leaning Rasmussen found that 40% of all voters thought FOX News deserved the non-award despite Trump’s insistence that FOX News not be included in the contest.

Size Matters: President Trump Puts ‘Rocket Man’ in His Place With Nuke Button Tweet

President Trump savaged North Korean despot Kim Jong Un after the “Rocket Man” threatened to unleash nuclear war on the United States.

On Monday, the North Korean leader claimed to have a button ready to launch nuclear weapons installed on his desk, stating that he wasn’t afraid to use it.

“The United States can never fight a war against me and our state,” Kim told North Koreans in a nationally televised New Year’s Eve event. “It should properly know that the whole territory of the U.S. is within the range of our nuclear strike and a nuclear button is always on the desk of my office, and this is just a reality, not a threat.”

It is worth noting that a literal “nuclear button” probably does not exist, as nuclear launches require exact coordinates and involve multiple officials at varying levels of government to execute. Furthermore, Kim Jong Un reportedly spends much of his time outside his office in Pyongyang, according to Newsweek.

In response to Kim’s bluster, Trump tweeted on Tuesday night that he too had a “nuclear button” available at the oval office, adding that “it is a much bigger & more powerful one than his, and my Button works!”

The exchange of insults is part of an on-going war of words between the United States president and the North Korean despot, with potentially devastating consequences—at least for North Korea, should Kim act on his threats.

Trump has repeatedly referred to the pudgy patriarch as “Rocket Man” and “Little Rocket Man.” He has also referred to the communist tyrant as a “madman,” and as a “sick puppy.” Kim Jong Un reportedly lives a gluttonous lifestyle while his people starve. Defectors of the North Korean regime allege that he maintains a stable of teenage girls as sex slaves, and executes people for a variety of personal infractions.

President Trump has made 1,950 false or misleading claims over 347 days

With just 18 days before President Trump completes his first year as president, he is now on track to exceed 2,000 false or misleading claims, according to our database that analyzes, categorizes and tracks every suspect statement uttered by the president.

As of Monday, the total stood at 1,950 claims in 347 days, or an average of 5.6 claims a day. (Our full interactive graphic can be found here.)

As regular readers know, the president has a tendency to repeat himself — often. There are now more than 60 claims that he has repeated three or more times. The president’s impromptu 30-minute interview with the New York Times over the holidays, in which he made at least 24 false or misleading claims, included many statements that we have previously fact-checked.

We currently have a tie for Trump’s most repeated claims, both made 61 times. Both of these claims date from the start of Trump’s presidency and to a large extent have faded as talking points.

One of these claims was some variation of the statement that the Affordable Care Act is dying and “essentially dead.” The Congressional Budget Office has said that the Obamacare exchanges, despite well-documented issues, are not imploding and are expected to remain stable for the foreseeable future. Indeed, healthy enrollment for the coming year has surprised health-care experts. Trump used to say this a lot, but he’s quieted down since his efforts to repeal the law flopped.
Trump also repeatedly takes credit for events or business decisions that happened before he took the oath of office — or had even been elected. Sixty-one times, he has touted that he secured business investments and job announcements that had been previously announced and could easily be found with a Google search.

With the successful push in Congress to pass a tax plan, two of Trump’s favorite talking points about taxes — that the tax plan will be the biggest tax cut in U.S. history and that the United States is one of the highest-taxed nations — have rapidly moved up the list.

Trump repeated the falsehood about having the biggest tax cut 53 times, even though Treasury Department data shows it would rank eighth. And 58 times Trump has claimed that the United States pays the highest corporate taxes (25 times) or that it is one of the highest-taxed nations (33 times). The latter is false; the former is misleading, as the effective U.S. corporate tax rate (what companies end up paying after deductions and benefits) ends up being lower than the statutory tax rate.

We also track the president’s flip-flops on our list, as they are so glaring. He spent the 2016 campaign telling supporters that the unemployment rate was really 42 percent and the official statistics were phony; now, on 46 occasions he has hailed the lowest unemployment rate in 17 years. It was already very low when he was elected — 4.6 percent, the lowest in a decade — so his failure to acknowledge that is misleading.

An astonishing 85 times, Trump has celebrated a rise in the stock market — even though in the campaign he repeatedly said it was a “bubble” that was ready to crash as soon as the Federal Reserve started raising interest rates. Well, the Fed has raised rates three times since the election — and yet the stock market has not plunged as Trump predicted. It has continued a rise in stock prices that began under President Barack Obama in 2009. Again, Trump has never explained his shift in position on the stock market.

Moreover, the U.S. stock-market rise in 2017 was not unique and mirrored a global rise in equities. When looking at the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index, it’s clear U.S. stocks haven’t rallied as robustly as their foreign equivalents. Yet Trump loves this claim so much that he has repeated it 28 times in the 49 days since our last update — more often than every other day.

We maintain the database by closely reading or watching Trump’s myriad public appearances and television and radio interviews. The interviews are especially hard to keep up with, in part because the White House does not routinely post on them on its website. In fact, a recent redesign of the White House website appears to make it difficult to find transcripts of Trump’s remarks at the White House.

This project originally started as a first-100-days database, but by popular demand we extended it to one year. We will soon face a decision about whether to maintain it beyond one year, even though it strains the resources (and weekends) of our staff. In at least one instance, the database was used for academic analysis. We welcome thoughts from readers about whether it remains a worthwhile endeavor.

Bernstein: Trump presidency characterized by his lies

Famed Watergate journalist Carl Bernstein said in a Sunday television interview that President Trump’s tenure in the White House has been “characterized” by Trump’s lying.

“There’s no reason to believe almost anything Donald Trump says,” Bernstein told CNN’s “State of the Union” when asked about the administration’s promise not to fire special counsel Robert Mueller.

“Because what we know is that the president of the United States and his presidency is characterized above all else by the lying of the president of the United States.”

Trump said earlier this month that he is not considering firing Mueller, who is leading the probe into Russia’s election meddling and any potential ties between Trump campaign staff and the Kremlin.

Bernstein, who broke the Watergate scandal during the presidency of Richard Nixon, said, however, that Trump’s lies do not necessarily constitute a crime.

“That doesn’t mean that lying by the president is a crime,” he said.

“It does mean that we see him covering up events, but not necessarily criminally covering up events. And where this is going, definitively, we don’t know.”

Bernstein added that White House officials have told him that Trump has conveyed “the desire to fire Mueller.”

Meghan Markle Speaks Out To Bash President Trump – It IMMEDIATELY Backfires

The entire world is preparing for May’s royal wedding in which the United Kingdom’s Prince Harry is set to marry Meghan Markle. Now, however, it looks like this wedding may not be happening after all after comments Markle made in the past resurfaced that the British royal family definitely will not like.

The British royal family strives to be politically neutral, and Queen Elizabeth herself has worked for decades to make sure that her family does not take sides politically. That’s why the entire royal family is undoubtedly not happy that an interview surfaced in which Markle slammed President Donald Trump like the shameless Hollywood liberal that she is.

The UK Independent reported that while appearing on TheNightly Show with Larry Wilmore in May of 2016, Markle was asked how the momentum of then-presidential candidate Trump could be slowed down. She didn’t hold anything back with her response, which was frankly anything but regal.

“It’s really the moment that I go, we film Suits in Toronto and I might just stay in Canada,” Markle replied. “I mean come on, if that’s reality we are talking about, come on, that is a game changer in terms of how we move in the world here.”
“Yes of course Trump is divisive. Think about just female voters alone,” she continued. “I think it was in 2012, the Republican Party lost the female vote by 12 points. That’s a huge number and with as misogynistic as Trump is and so vocal about it, that’s a huge chunk of it. You’re not just voting for a woman if it’s Hillary because she’s a woman, but certainly because Trump has made it easy to see that you don’t really want that kind of world that he’s painting.”

Experts have warned that Markle’s vocally anti-Trump views could become a big “problem” for the British royal family.

“It’s a bit like going in the goldfish bowl. Everything changes,” Dickie Arbiter, a former press secretary to Prince Charles, said of Markle. “What she was able to say before she came into ‘the firm’ is very different to what she is going to be able to say now. It all changes.”

“Now she has come into the royal family, she will have to be politically neutral,” he continued. “Harry has probably made that perfectly clear. He knows she has been outspoken, but all that has to stop. She is going to have to adapt. I am sure she is on the road already.”

Dem: Trump ‘most despicable human being’ to serve as president

Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) slammed President Trump in an interview Sunday, calling him “the most despicable human being ever” to serve as president.

“Donald Trump is the most despicable human being to ever reside in 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,” Cohen said on MSNBC.

“A narcissistic sociopath doesn’t change,” he continued. “It endangers the country. And war…is something he could get into to improve the ratings for the [2018] elections, where they [Republicans] are in desperate shape.”

Cohen remarks followed a tweet Sunday in which he said Trump could start a war.

The Tennessee Democrat, a fierce critic of Trump, sponsored five articles of impeachment against Trump in November.

Joined by five other House Democrats, Cohen introduced the articles accusing Trump of being a danger to the country, obstructing justice in his firing of former FBI Director James Comey and violating the foreign emoluments clause of the Constitution.

“Given the magnitude of the constitutional crisis, there’s no reason for delay,” Cohen said at the time.

Cohen had previously announced in August he would introduce articles of impeachment against Trump based on his comments following the deadly violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

“Instead of unequivocally condemning hateful actions by neo-Nazis, white nationalists and Klansmen following a national tragedy, the president said ‘there were very fine people on both sides.’ There are no good Nazis. There are no good Klansmen,” Cohen said in a statement at the time.

The majority of the Democratic caucus, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (Calif.), have not supported attempts to impeach Trump.